American Scholar Interview

American Scholar Interview

Fragmented Landscapes

03/04/2019

“I was always drawn to Modernist work—anything since the early 1900s. I admire artists who think more abstractly about the world and are influenced by nature, psychology, and philosophy. They were formally trained, but slowly condensed things to an essence. When I was young, I became interested in the sprawl of suburban Chicago. It wasn’t necessarily urban, but it wasn’t nature either. It forced me to analyze American culture in terms of landscape. Where do you find beauty amid the banality of things? There was an emptiness to the stretch of strip malls in the suburbs that I felt the need to explore. Why are people happy living in this type of world? Why are they so accepting of it?

 

A.I.R. Gallery Solo Exhibition

A.I.R. Gallery Solo Exhibition

STRATUS LIFT

February 8th — March 10th, 2019

A.I.R. Gallery is pleased to announce Stratus Lift, an exhibition by New York artist Carrie Johnson. Johnson will be showing a new body of large paintings that use abstraction to draw attention to the contemporary landscape, and our ability to consider the elements of modern society in an abstract way. This is the artist’s first solo exhibition in New York City.     

Lichtundfire Group Show

Lichtundfire Group Show

ABSTRACT CONNECTIVITY — The freedom from representational qualities in art

January 9, 2019 – February 3, 2019

Lichtundfire is pleased to present ABSTRACT CONNECTIVITY, an exhibition of work by eight artists working in various media, painting, works on paper, and sculpture, representing abstraction from the expressive to the minimal, and from the bold and colorful to the subtle, distinct application of paint.

Profile by Lynn Maliszewski

October 2018

Look at the city of New York. Nobody can tell me that man feels like a king in New York. He is just an ant on an ant heap and doesn’t count at all, he is superfluous there, the ant heap is the thing that counts.
— C.G. Jung (1)

 

What’s the point of abstract painting in the twenty-first century? Why hold steadfast to formal suggestion and ambiguity? Carrie Johnson’s abstract paintings on canvas establish balance and a sense of imaginary space dissociated from the regimen of time. Even if flux is the singular constant,...

New Art In An Old House, A.I.R. Gallery Artists

New Art In An Old House, A.I.R. Gallery Artists

House 5B, Nolan Park, Governors Island

July 30th - September 26th, 2016

A.I.R, the first and foremost women’s collective gallery in the United States represents artists from across the country.   More than 20 of the gallery artists are participating in the Governors Island exhibition with works in various media including painting, drawing, mixed media, video and sculpture.  There will be several site-specific pieces both inside and outside the house.  A number of these works were first seen in the recent A.I.R. exhibition curated by Rocio Aranda-Alvarado, “In the Secret Garden”.

 

Participating artists are Janet Decker Yanez, d’Ann de Simone, Jenn Dierdorf, Elise Dodeles, Jacqueline Ferrante, Shannon Forrester, Melissa Furness, Maxine Henryson, Carrie Johnson, Jody Joldersma, Cynthia Karasek, Julia Kim Smith, Jayanthi Moorthy, Nancy Morrow, Catherine Mosley, Ann Schaumburger, Patty Smith, Susan Stainman, Erica Stoller,  Amy Swartele, Jane Swavely, Erin Wiersma, and Joo Yeon Woo.

Anita Rogers Gallery Summer Group Show

Anita Rogers Gallery Summer Group Show

New York, NY

July 26th, 2016

Anita Rogers Gallery presents a group exhibition featuring works by Carrie Johnson, Gordon Moore and Kazimira Rachfal. Collectively, the show serves as an exploration of line, of balance and of the stylistic and psychological complexity of seemingly simple spatial forms. The show is on view from July 26 through September 6, 2016 at 77 Mercer Street, Suite 2N in New York City. Untitled, the artist’s large oil on canvas piece in this show, is an interconnected mix of elegant, organic lines in muted tones with pops of color. The layered piece is ripe with detail and texture. 

 

On the work, Johnson states: 
This painting is part of a series which evolved from works on paper shown at the Drawing Center in 2001. Open natural form structures in a state of reconfiguring layered in an atmospheric background aim to evoke a feeling of confronting what was left behind and what remains.